Tag Archives: healthy alternatives

Spinach Salad with Figs, Walnuts, and Brie

A salad can be an accompaniment to a meal or can be a meal itself. The portion size determines everything – salads are a great way to incorporate seasonal fruits and vegetables into your meal. If you are making your salad and entrée, make good choices to ensure you have a balanced meal and include protein and carbohydrates.

 

I find the keys to success with a salad include bold flavors, multiple textures, and a variety of food groups.

 

This salad can be a meal or a side dish. If using as a meal, you may wish to serve gluten-free crackers on the side or gluten free cornbread. If the figs are very ripe and juicy, you may not need salad dressing. If you do need dressing, I suggest a simple oil and vinegar so that the flavor of the fruit and brie stands out, not the dressing.

 

Figs are a great find when they are in season. They are low in calories while high in dietary fiber and antioxidants. Research shows the chlorogenic acid helps lower blood sugar levels and control glucose; an important factor for those with adult onset diabetes.

 

Base Ingredients:

Spinach

Fresh Figs

Brie

Walnuts (another soft nut like pecans can be used instead)

Screen Shot 2015-09-08 at 11.33.57 AM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Optional:

Oil and Vinegar Dressing

Add diced dates for flavor and texture


Enjoy this YogaLean recipe and other gluten-free recipes at Healthy Recipe Variations

Kathryn Herbert on Ancient Healing in the Modern World

July 27, 2015 | Emelyn Daly, YogaFit Media

Ayurveda, ‘Life Science,’ and Common Sense

Expert Ayurvedic Practitioner and founder of Ayuway of Life Kathryn Herbert has me totally convinced of the value, efficacy, and do-it-yourself easiness of the ancient Holistic healing modality she teaches and practices. Herbert, who is thrilled to share her expertise at YogaFit’s first Ayurvedic Lifestyle Coaching Retreat in Austin, TX this September, has dedicated her life to using and educating others on Ayurveda. Here, she gives us an exclusive introduction to her upcoming workshops, which focus on making Ayurveda fun, user-friendly, and 100% applicable in daily life.

What is Ayurveda? What are some of the most common misconceptions about it?

“The first thing I like to tell people about Ayurveda is that in order to use it in your daily life, you don’t shutterstock_223478743have to know how to spell or pronounce it correctly! The word may sound a little unusual, but it’s much simpler than you think. In Sanskrit, ayu means ‘life’ and veda means ‘knowledge’ or ‘science.’ ‘Life science’ isn’t just ancient Sanskrit; it’s for everybody living in modern times. To me, it is the perfect owner’s manual package of common sense for the human mind, body and spirit.”

Ayurveda comes from India, correct? How does it relate to other forms of medicine?

“So, yes, the ancient health and wellness knowledge we know as Ayurveda does come from the Indus Valley. And from there, it actually traveled East and West, influencing both Chinese and Western medicine. Hippocrates was an Ayurvedic practitioner! The father of Western medicine himself said, “let food be thy medicine, and medicine be thy food.” That is Ayurveda.”

Do you think that Ayurvedic medicine could replace Western medicine?

“No, I would never recommend that Ayurveda can or should replace Western, aka ‘Modern’ medicine, yet it certainly does complement any and every form of medicine including surgery and as a preventative, it is designed to keep you out of the doctor’s office.

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You know, in the West, we have a way of putting everything on a hierarchy. This or that has to be better or worse than something else. The East integrates healing approaches as opposed to creating that separation, which is the absolute definition of Holistic, it treats the whole person. In India, for example, an Ayurvedic doctor is a medical doctor, and there is a modern Ayurvedic hospital right next door to the modern Allopathic hospital, patients are sent back and forth by doctors from both sides. Both forms are equally valuable and used to compliment each other. I experienced this daily during my internship there.”

Which piece of your workshop in Austin are you most looking forward to?

“So many! I love my work because I get to translate this powerful knowledge into modern language and practical uses. In Austin, I’ll get to share my academic knowledge of Ayurveda, which works amazingly well with the YogaFit system. We’ll look at a couple Sanskrit words to demystify these new, hard-to-pronounce terms into common sense simplicity.

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And there’s the practical end of things, which is really exciting! I’ll be showing people how to use this stuff in their daily lives. We’ll spend time on really concrete techniques that will be easily remembered to take home and use. We’ll spend plenty of time on food, and turn the tabletop into a classroom using food as medicine to learn why your kitchen is actually a pharmacy to be in service of yourself, those you love, and those you coach. Plus there are really fun Ayurvedic treatment practicums including the ‘meda buster’ massage to reduce fat on the body—one of my favorites!”

 

For more information about Kathryn Herbert and her workshops at the YogaFit Ayurvedic Lifestyle Coaching Retreat in Austin, TX coming up this September, visit YogaFit.com!

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Kathryn Herbert practices privately in Southern California at the Ayurway of Life facilities and conducts national workshops to promote the benefits of Ayurvedic lifestyle choices. She lives in Los Angeles with her two teenaged children, two dogs, a cat, and three horses. She hopes to welcome chickens to her home soon!

Sunburst Pasta

Tolerant Red Lentil Pasta has a bit of a peppery flavor when eaten on its own. When I use it in a recipe I look to find flavors that enhance the pasta’s natural flavors. This dish uses sundried tomatoes for a sweet flavor, chickpeas for a meaty texture, onions and garlic as aromatics, and mushrooms for a chewy texture. This creates not only a tasty and satisfying meal that can be a side dish or a main dish depending on the portion you make.

Base Ingredients (Serves 2):

1 Cup Tolerant Red Lentil Pasta (uncooked)

1 Cup Diced Sundried Tomatoes

½ Yellow Onion or Sweet Vidalia Onion

4-6 Cloves of Garlic depending on size

1 Cup Diced Mushrooms of Choice (I used button)

4 TBSP Oil – I use Olive Oil for this dish

1/3 Cup Vegetable Broth – I prefer to use low sodium

Variations:

Substitute 2 Shallots for Onion and Garlic

Instructions:

1. Dice onions and garlic and place in a pan with the oil. Satuee in oil

until translucent.

Pasta12. Add diced sundried tomatoes, mushrooms, and broth to pan and

sautee until broth is almost absorbed.

3. Bring 4 cups of water to a running boil. Add 1 cup of Tolerant Red

Lentil Pasta. Cook for 5 minutes. Stir from time to time and reduce

heat as needed so the water does not boil over.

4. Reserve 1/3 cup pasta water and add to the pan with the vegetables.

5. Drain Pasta and add to the pan with the vegetables.

6. Cook until liquid is absorbed.

Serve or place in an airtight container and pack for lunch!

Sprinkle with ground black pepper.

Option: Grate parmesan over the pasta.

Enjoy this low calorie, high fiber Yoga Lean meal; a satisfying meal to keep you fueled as you lead an active lifestyle.

Broccoli Greens Tofu Stir Fry

Not only do I love to eat light and healthy foods, but I also do not like to waste food. When I had an opportunity to try broccoli and cauliflower greens I was elated! This was an opportunity to experience two vegetables I love in an entirely new way. UntitledI have used the greens as a side dish on their own and have enjoyed using them in stir-fry dishes also. The great thing about a stir-fry is that it is a way to use of vegetables that you have in the refrigerator. You do not need to have a large portion of any one vegetable to make a successful stir-fry. Each time you make a stir-fry you can use a different sauce as well. It can be an ever-changing recipe. Of course, when you find a combination you like, you may want to make it time and time again!

 

1 package EXTRA FIRM TOFU (Azumaya brand is Non-GMO and Gluten Free)

1/2 a box of Thai Kitchen Stir-Fry Rice Noodles or 2 Cups cooked rice

Vegetables (aim for 4 -6 cups uncooked):

5 Large Broccoli Stems/Leaves

5 Large Cauliflower Stems/Leaves

4-6 Garlic Cloves (depending on size)

I used 1 cup Tessemae’s Lemon Chesapeake All Natural Dressing/Marinade/Dip

1/2 Cup Vegetable Broth (Unsalted is preferable).

1. Decide if you wish noodles or rice. If you wish rice, start the rice cooking as step one. If you want noodles, wait till the vegetables and tofu are done. Cooking rice is 2 cups of liquid per 1 cup of dry rice. Cook a single batch if you are not interested in leftovers, double (or more) the recipe if you wish leftovers.

2. For crispier TOFU (omit this step if you are not looking for crispy), drain the package and allow some water to be removed. I place the tofu block in a kitchen towel and place it between two dinner plates for about 1 hour. This step can be done the night before, while you are at work, or skipped entirely.

3. Wash and chop the vegetables you are using. Try to make the vegetables into even sized so they cook at the same rate. With the greens and stems, I do put thestems in the pan a few minutes before the “leafy section”.

4. In a sautee pan place 2 TBSP Toasted Sesame Oil and the vegetables. Add the marinade and broth. Cook on medium heat. Stir from time to time. If you need additional liquid to soften the vegetables, add ¼ cup of water at a time.

5. After the vegetables have started, cut the tofu and place in a second sauté pan with 2 TBSP Toasted Sesame Oil. Sprinkle pepper on the tofu if you wish the additional flavor. Cook on medium heat and rotate the tofu periodically so all sides brown and form a bit of a crust.

6. When vegetables and tofu are done, turn the burners off and let rest for a few minutes. If you are making noodles, bring a pot of water to a boil. Once a running boil is attained, break the noodles in half and cook for 5 minutes. Reduce heat to medium and stir once or twice. Drain noodles.

On your plate put a bed of noodles or rice then add the vegetables. The tofu can be sprinkled on top or arranged in a pattern for a finished presentation.

Enjoy and savor the flavors!

Option: Sprinkle nuts or sesame seeds over the top.

Read more Gluten Free recipes at Healthy Recipe Variations Blog. Enjoy being YogaLean as you enjoy an active lifestyle and make healthy eating choices.

Grown Up Macaroni and Cheese

 mac4

Many of us had macaroni and cheese in some form, homemade or prepared, when we were children. As adults, we look to recreate that comfort food with a bit of sophistication. There are many variations to this tried-and-true comfort food!

 

The star of the show in this dish is Tolerant Organic Black Been Rotini; a Gluten Free pasta that adds flavor and fiber to every meal.

 

mac1

 

Base Ingredients:

  • 2 Cups Tolerant Black Bean Rotini
  • 2 Cups Cheese (I used 1 1/2 cups Cheddar blend and ½ cup Italian blend)
  • ½ Cup Milk (I used Almond Milk)
  • 1 TBSP Butter (I always use unsalted)
  • 1 TBSP Gluten Free Quinoa Flour (Any Gluten Free flour will work)
  • 2 TBSP Chipotle Seasoning (this is mild…use a real Chipotle Pepper in addition to the dry seasoning or double seasoning if you wish more spice)
  • 1 ½ cups thinly sliced vegetables (I used Red Bell Peppers and Red Onions sliced on a mandolin)
  • 4 TBSP Gluten Free Panko Bread Crumbs

 

mac2

 

Other Variations:

  • For a thinner sauce, add more milk
  • Add 1 diced tomato
  • Substitute Shallot for Onion
  • Add Diced Garlic (2-4 cloves depending on your spice preference and size of cloves)
  • Substitute Broccoli and/or Cauliflower for the vegetables and substitute Paprika for Chipotle seasoning
  • Add meat such as Gluten Free Sausage or Canadian Bacon

 

Instructions:

  1. Use a mandolin to cut the vegetables into small strips…or use a knife and cut the vegetables into small pieces. Place in a pan with a TBSP of olive oil and sautee until onions are translucent. (Reserve some vegetable for garnish if you prefer.)
  2. Add 1 TBSP butter and 1 TBSP Gluten Free Quinoa Flour into the pan and melt it. Stir to combine the flour with the melted butter and vegetables. Remove from the heat.
  3. On another burner, bring water to a boil in a pot and, once boiled, add 2 cups Tolerant Organic Black Bean Rotini. Cook the pasta 5 minutes then strain.
  4. Add the vegetable and cheese pan back to the stove on low heat, add the pasta and seasoning, and stir to combine.
  5. Serve…garnish with extra vegetables and panko breadcrumbs if you wish a little crunch.

 

 

mac3

 

This can be a main dish or side dish. Make a salad or vegetable to accompany the main dish or sandwich to accompany the side dish.

 

Read more Gluten Free Recipes with options to customize on Healthy Recipe Variations.

 

 

Banana Walnut Breakfast Bars 

bannuts

Some mornings we need a grab-and-go breakfast. These breakfast bars are high in protein and contain fruit and healthy carbohydrates. Depending on the size you make them, you can have one or two for breakfast or a snack later in the day. Couple the bar with a piece of fruit if you are on the go or Greek yogurt if you have time to sit down.

 

bananabars

 

HINT: If you do have time to sit down…eat them warm with a little Berry Chia Jam on top!

 

Base Recipe:

3 RIPE Bananas

2 Cups Dried Oats

1/2 Cup Ground Flaxseed Meal

1/4 Cup Walnut Butter (I used Artisana Organics)

1/4 Cup Diced Walnuts

1 TSP Almond Flavoring

 

Variations:

Use any combination of nuts/nut butter (Artisana has Cashew, Pecan, Almond)

Replace Almond Flavoring with 1 TBSP Vanilla Protein Powder (Gluten Free)

Add 1/4 cup dried fruit

 

HINT: I love a little extra nut butter … the SQUEEZE PACKS (pictured) are a great way to add more protein to the bar. I like to cut the bar in half and make it a nut butter sandwich.

 

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°
  2. Combine wet ingredients in a stand up mixer
  3. Fold in dry ingredients
  4. Pace on an UN-greased cookie sheet and cook for 12-20 minutes depending on size of bar…check halfway through as each oven temperature is a bit different!

 

HINT: The size of the bar is up to you. I often take a serving spoon and to scoop batter out of the mixing bowl and use another spoon to slide batter onto the baking sheet. You could use tablespoons, soupspoons, or teaspoons…you pick the size!

 

Enjoy this YOGALEAN start to your day. Ingredients you can pronounce, high protein and high fiber to keep you satiated, and very few preservatives!

Read my blog, Healthy Recipe Variations, and check out my Facebook Page (HealthyRecipeVariations) for more Gluten Free recipes…with variations – Rene’ MacVay.

Pineapple Upside Down “Cake” for Breakfast

I was looking to make a healthy version of pineapple upside down cake, a traditional spring treat, so I decided to turn the flavors of pineapple upside down cake into a bread…making it a breakfast item!

 

This recipe has MORE ingredients than I usually use, but it’s worth it for this spring dish!

 

Pinapple1

 

Base Ingredients:

2 Jars (2 oz) of Cherry Man Maraschino Cherries

1 Cup Dried pineapple cut into small pieces

WET:

1/2 Cup Butter at ROOM Temperature

2 Eggs

2 TSP Vanilla

3/4 Cup Almond Milk

1/3 Cup Sugar

DRY:

1/3 Cup Vanilla Gluten Free Protein Powder

1/3 Cup Ground Flax Seed Meal

1 1/4 TSP Baking Powder

1/2 TSP Salt

1 1/2 Cups Almond Flour

1 1/2 Cups Coconut Flour

 

Instructions:

  1. Combine wet and dry ingredients in separate bowls…use the standing mixer bowl for the wet ingredients.
  2. Fold the dry ingredients into the wet.
  3. Stir then add the Cherry Man Cherries (including juice) and pineapple.
  4. Spray a loaf pan (or use 12 muffin liners) and transfer dough to pan.
  5. Bake for about an hour at 350 (30 minutes if muffin size). Check half-way through cooking … and then periodically after that. You can cover with foil half way through cooking to keep the top light in color.

 

Variations:

Add coconut flakes

Omit Protein Powder and increase flax seed meal

Use All-purpose gluten free flour in place of almond and coconut flour

Add a 1/2 a 15 oz. can of diced/drained pineapple instead of dried pineapple

 

pineapple2

 

Enjoy a slice of this YogaLean bread (or muffin) with fruit and/or Greek Yogurt to start your day!

Find more Gluten Free recipes with variations on my blog HealthyRecipeVariations – Rene’ MacVay.

Peas and Asparagus Your Way

aparagus

I make a concerted effort to eat fruits and vegetables when they are in season, when they are at their peak. Asparagus is in season in March and April in California which means not only is the vegetable fresh but also reasonable in price. This vegetable is low in calories but high in fiber, folates, vitamins, and antioxidants. I was excited to see the nutritious asparagus on sale! I love roasted asparagus and steamed asparagus, but wished to try something new! Therefore, I purchased peas to cook along with the asparagus to make a satisfying side dish. I purchased organic frozen peas to supplement what I was able to purchase in the store.

 peas1 

This dish can be adapted in several ways. I’ll give you suggestions after the base recipe. Enjoy this YogaLean recipe that is low in calorie, high in flavor, and satiates you for a long time. Have fun playing with your food! Read more recipes on my blog, http://healthyrecipevariations.blogspot.com/.

peas2

Base Recipe:

I package of Asparagus (usually about a pound)

1 pound peas or 1 (one) 16 ounce bag frozen (organic if possible) peas

Half a Vidalia Sweet Onion or 4 cloves of garlic

Olive or Walnut Oil

Vegetable broth

 

Instructions:

  • Chop the onion or garlic into small pieces and add to a pan with 2 TBSP oil
  • Prepare the asparagus. Hold the spear in both hands. Snap the base off the rest of the stem. The brittle and fibrous end will break off leaving the tender portion of the spear. Chop the spear into dime size pieces. Leave the “decorative tip” as it is. It is tender and will cook swiftly. (Also, it is attractive to look at and will end up being a great garnish for the dish!)
  • If using frozen peas, no broth will need to be added. If using fresh peas and asparagus, add ½ cup of low sodium vegetable broth to the pan.
  • Sautée until the vegetables are tender.

 

OPTION 1: Stop here and serve in a bowl. You can garnish with sesame seeds or cheese (I suggest Feta or Parmesan) if you wish the decoration and crunch.

 

HINT: This is a great side dish for a sandwich or lean protein. Baby red skinned potatoes would be a good pairing.

 

peas3

 

OPTION 2: At this point, add 1 cup of cooked quinoa to the pan JUST BEFORE the liquid is absorbed. Stir to combine the ingredients. Serve.

 

HINT: Add fried tofu, chicken, or beef to this dish for additional protein.

 

peas4

 

OPTION 3: Dice walnuts or pecans and place in a pan with ½ TBSP butter, 1-2 TBSP brown sugar (substitute honey or agave), and ¼ cup of water or vegetable broth. Reduce until the mixture caramelizes. Pour over vegetables or vegetable and quinoa mixture.

 

peas5

 

 

 

Three Vegetable Lentil Pasta

pasta 1

I decided to try a new Gluten Free Lentil Pasta made by Tolerant (http://www.tolerantfoods.com/). As someone with an Art History background, I like to find ways to make my food look good. Since it has been proven that we first eat with our eyes, I try to choose colors that go together, balance nutrients, and find an appealing flavor profile. The first look entices us to try the food. The taste and texture get us to continue eating!

 

 

Base Ingredients:

Black-eyed Peas

Kohlrabi

Red Onion

Garlic

Cauliflower

Oil

Vegetable broth

Unsalted butter

Lemon juice

Black-eyed peas are low in calories and high in fiber. They are a source of protein for vegetarians and contain potassium, zinc, and iron.

 

Kohlrabi is low in calories and high in dietary fiber like black-eyed peas. It is a rich source of vitamin C and B complex vitamins. It is a good source of calcium, potassium, and iron.

 

pasta 2

 

Substitutions:

Shallots for onion and garlic

Vidalia onion for sweet flavor

Black beans or chickpeas for black-eyed peas

Chicken or beef broth for vegetable broth

 

Instructions:

Cut ½ a red onion into small pieces

Dice 4-6 cloves of garlic (depending on size)

Trim the leaves off the kohlrabi and save for another recipe. Remove the outer skin of the kohlrabi and dice into small pieces (just a bit larger than your pieces of onion).

Cut a cup of cauliflower florets into small pieces

Sautee vegetables in 1 tbsp of oil (I used walnut oil) and 1 cup of vegetable broth until tender.

Add 1 cup of black-eyed peas (drain and rinse beans from a can OR use beans you have rehydrated already).

 

In a separate pot bring 6 cups of water to a boil. Add 2 cups of uncooked pasta and stir from time to time to check for doneness. Cook about 5 minutes, removing the pasta when it is just a bit al dente.

 

Reserve 1 cup of the pasta water

 

Drain the pasta and add to the pan with the vegetables. Add 1 TBSP unsalted butter, 2 TBSP lemon juice (fresh squeezed is ideal), and some of the reserved pasta water. Add the pasta water ¼ cup at a time. Use it only to integrate the dish. You may not need to use it all! You are coating the pasta, not creating a sauce.

pasta 3

 

Serve: As a side dish to accompany a sandwich or animal protein. Sprinkle with feta or parmesan if you wish to add a salty/creamy taste. Sprinkle with sesame seeds if you wish for a bit of a crunch.

 

Cooking Time: From set up to clean up 30-45 minutes

 

Read more recipes on my blog, Healthy Recipe Variations!

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